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NEWS STORIES

Snow piles up at cornersSubmitted: 02/28/2014

Matt Brooks
Morning Meteorologist/Reporter
mbrooks@wjfw.com


RHINELANDER - Snowy roads can cause plenty of driving problems, but tall piles of snow can be just as dangerous.

Snow piled up at corners of intersections greatly cuts into what drivers can see as they turn the corners.

The best thing to do is to slowly ease forward to improve your line of sight.

"You want to stop at that stop line then slowly creep forward into the intersection and see a clearer path coming into the intersection," said Sergeant Kurt Helke of the Rhinelander Police Department. "You don't want to blindly pull out into the intersection, that's where there's going to be an increased accident rate."

Folks at Rhinelander Public Works are working to get rid of that piled-up snow.

Part of River Street was sectioned off today in order to get rid of the excess snow piles.

The Rhinelander Police Department and Public Works communicate often to keep the roads as drivable as possible.

"We have a pretty good communication for that and the same thing goes with dealing with these hazardous intersections when we deal with them," said Sgt. Helke. "If one is worse than another one we'll have dispatch contact the city shop and they'll send somebody out right away."

Snow and icy roads do cause the most winter accidents this time of year versus the snow banks.

Still, you should take turns slowly this time of year because it's hard to tell what's headed your way.

Rhinelander Public Works says the snow should completely melt sometime in April.




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