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NEWS STORIES

Getting messy for a causeSubmitted: 05/03/2014

Karolina Buczek
Reporter/Anchor
kbuczek@wjfw.com


CRANDON - Bright colors bursting through the air can attract a large crowd.

The Colors of Cancer 5K run in Crandon gave people a chance to get messy for a cause.

The runners were splattered with different colored powders throughout the run.

"Each color station represents a different ribbon. We had the yellow representing childhood cancer, the pink for breast, the blue for prostate and colon, orange for leukemia. Then we end with purple which represents all the different cancers," said Kadie Montgomery, a member of the Forest County Ties That Bind Us.

The Ties That Bind Us of Forest County hosted the run.

The money raised will help cancer patients pay for gas so they can get to their treatment.

Event organizers believe many people with cancer can't afford paying for gas to get to the hospitals.

"Especially when the travel is 30 minutes, 45 minutes, and some people are driving all the way to Wausau depending on their treatment. Some people have to go every day so we wanted something that was going to help them get to treatment," said Montgomery.

The group will help anyone who has cancer in Forest County.

"Currently, anyone in Forest County that is undergoing treatment qualifies for this. It doesn't matter about your income or anything," said Montgomery.

More than 500 people ran in the color run.

Event organizers wanted to make the run something everyone could participate in.

"We really wanted something all kids could participate in. One of goals through the ties that bind us is to incorporate health and wellness to the community. We wanted a fun event that kids were going to enjoy, just get out and enjoy the day," said Montgomery.


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