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NEWS STORIES

Convicted murderer finds out sentence for escapingSubmitted: 05/13/2014

Kaitlyn Howe
Reporter/Producer
khowe@wjfw.com


RHINELANDER - The convicted murderer who walked away from his work release job found out how much time he'll serve for escaping. Todd Brecht is currently serving a life sentence for shooting and killing his brother in law in 1985.

Today he found out he got two more years added to that sentence. Because he's serving a life sentence he'll only serve those extra years if he gets released on parole.

Brecht went missing last September from his work release job at the St. Germain Golf Course. His lawyer spoke about Brecht's good behavior before the escape.

"Mr. Brecht is generally a person that can be productive he can also function effictively in normal social environments. And before he was incarcerated in 1985, did not have a serious criminal record either," says John Voorhees, Brecht's lawyer.

Brecht is up for parole in July. The Judge said the parole commission's decision will affect Brecht more than today's sentencing.

"Despite everything that has happened over the last 28 years at this point in time the Department of Corrections has reason to question whether they can trust you at this point," says Judge Michael Bloom.

Brecht did apologize at his sentencing today.

"I'd like to apologize to the people at St. Germain Golf Course. Because I did work up there for three years and I did enjoy my work. Almost three decades ago when I was incarcerated I fashioned myself that my main objective was to someday be released into society," says Brecht.

Brecht had been an inmate at the McNaughton Correctional Center in Lake Tomahawk. Police found him in Orlando, Florida a few days after escaping.


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